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THE GREAT GOLD RUSH William Henry Pope Jarvis

THE GREAT GOLD RUSH

William Henry Pope Jarvis

Published March 5th 2011
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PREFACEThere is a freemasonry among Klondikers which rules that no tales shallbe told out of school. If, therefore, this were an historical novel, ifI were telling tales and seeking to escape censure by the subterfuge ofchanging names, I could hardlyMorePREFACEThere is a freemasonry among Klondikers which rules that no tales shallbe told out of school. If, therefore, this were an historical novel, ifI were telling tales and seeking to escape censure by the subterfuge ofchanging names, I could hardly succeed. Let me take the case of Poo-Bah,for instance. The reader with a knowledge of the early days of Dawsonaccepting the story as historical, would fix as the original any one ofhalf a dozen men indecently caricatured. But if he is told the characteris a composite one, that it is the personification of Dawson graft, or,in other words, that it is the sum of a merger, he will understand and,I think, make no complaint.Otherwise the story may be accepted as the authors best effort toconvey a true account of the different phases of the worlds mostremarkable stampede. The stories of corruption among the officials inDawson are those which a visitor would have heard on every hand, and atthe present time there are many old-timers in the Yukon who will telltales similar to the incidents I have introduced in my story.When one of my characters speaks of the Dawson officials as pettylarceny thieves and highway robbers, it is to be understood to be asample of the phraseology in vogue at the time.The different types of prospector I have attempted to portray are thoseI have met, lived with, and mixed with. Should it appear I have giventoo much space to the humble economies of the miners life, I shalladvance as my excuse the lack of our literature in this particular.I have also made a humble attempt to establish the respectability of theminer. So much has been written to compromise him, and so manyimaginations have drawn lurid pictures of his morals, I feel it his due.In a general way the reader may accept anything in my story which hasnone other than an historical interest as being accurate.I am indebted to the Rev. Archdeacon Macdonald, now of Winnipeg, for thestory of his first discovery of gold. For the story of the discovery ofFranklin Gulch I am indebted to Mr. William Hartz, who also furnishedthe accounts of the finding of gold in the Stewart River. These accountshave never before been written.W. H. P. J.TORONTO, CANADA._January_ 1913.CONTENTSCHAPTER PAGEI. THE FORTUNE-SEEKERS. 1II. JOHN BERWICK 11III. THE BEGINNING OF YUKON 21IV. SOCIETY IN ALASKA 30V. SOAPYS LITTLE GAME 38VI. HITTING THE TRAIL 48VII. HUGHS PHILOSOPHY 62VIII. OVER THE SUMMIT 71IX. STORM AND STRESS 80X. AN EMPIRES OUTPOST 90XI. ANOTHER PASS 95XII. A NEW PARTNER 107XIII. THE DANCE 115XIV. A LONG SHOT 126XV. REVELATION 133XVI. A STREAM OF HISTORY 137XVII. DAWSON 149XVIII. POO-BAH! 158XIX. GRAFT 170XX. A LOTTERY 182XXI. THE PEELS HOSPITAL 194XXII. THE LAST STRAW 201XXIII. REVOLUTION 214XXIV. WITHIN THE BARRACKS 223XXV. RECRUITING 230XXVI. LOCATED 236XXVII. THE WOOD-PILE 244XXVIII. A COUNCIL OF WAR 251XXIX. STONY GROUND 257XXX. ON THE SCENT 265XXXI. AN ODIOUS DILEMMA 274XXXII. A DERELICT 280XXXIII. TRIBUTE 286XXXIV. NO SURRENDER 294XXXV. THE MAN WITH THE POUCH 299XXXVI. AFTER THE CRISIS 307XXXVII. OIL ON TROUBLED WATERS 313XXXVIII. REUNION 319XXXIX. RETROSPECTION 325XL. THE HAPPY ENDING 331